“I share my story and what it is like to be a TB patient so that people can understand why we need to bring an end to this disease.”
-Melquiades Huauya Ore

Our Change Agent Program

At Strongheart we use the power of personal story to help solve complex social issues. We partner with individuals who have overcome adversity and trauma and work with them to become advocates for the causes and issues they have experienced and are passionate about.
Strongheart provides strategic planning, partnership development, comprehensive training, and ongoing support to these individuals as they journey through the change agent process. Once equipped with advanced communications skills and subject matter expertise beyond their personal experience, their voices take on new power.
Through original content creation and collaborations in film, music and art as well as strategic media placement, our change agents’ voices and stories are amplified — sparking engagement and galvanizing action.
Strongheart also finds where their voices need to be heard and connects them with those audiences. We monitor policy developments and advocacy around our issues, which allows us to identify and create targeted opportunities for our change agents to participate in high level events and decision maker meetings, where their contributions provide critical insights to inform policy makers, program specialists, and funders.  

CREATIVE STORYTELLING

STRATEGIC MEDIA PLACEMENTS

SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS

Asia Society’s Game Changer Awards
Aspen Institute’s Ideas Festival
Canadian Embassy in Kabul
Clinton Global Initiative
Enterprising Women Making Art
Family of Women Film Festival
Ford Foundation’s Celebrating Progress Toward Ending Child Marriage
Gates Foundation’s Goalkeepers
Girls Not Brides’s Netherlands special event
Global Nomads Group’s Young Heroes
Google and Youtube’s Summit for Social Change
NEXUS’s Global Youth Summit
Numerous middle and high school assemblies
PepsiCo’s Connecting for our Future
PLAN International (Norway) & Prime Minister Erna Solberg’s Intl. Day of the Girl
Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights’s Curriculum launch
Soka Gakkai International’s Culture of Peace event
Skoll World Forum
Sundance Institute’s Moral Imagination panel
Surefire’s Conference for Girls
TEDxDenver
TEDxYouth@Austin
Texas Governor’s Conference for Women
The Dalai Lama Center for Peace and Education’s Connecting for Change
The United Nations Refugee Agency’s (UNHCR) “Peace Is” Event
US Department of State’s Women of Courage Awards
US Senate Briefings
Women for Afghan Women’s Gala Event
Women in the World’s London and New York Summits
Women Leaders in Global Health’s Stanford conference
Women’s Refugee Commission’s Gala
World Bank Group’s Forum on Fragility, Conflict and Violence
World Merit’s Merit 360 event

IMPACT EXAMPLE

CIVILIAN PROTECTION IN CONFLICT SETTINGS

Evelyn Apoko was abducted by the LRA, a rebel group in Northern Uganda when she was a young teenager. She was badly injured when the government bombed the rebels, but she eventually escaped to freedom and became part of our program. Evelyn underwent multiple surgeries over many years, through the help of Strongheart and our partners.
Strongheart worked with Evelyn to develop into a strong advocate for the rights of survivors of conflict abduction – and for civilians caught in conflict. Through Strongheart, she appeared on Oprah, CNN, and in various other media outlets on behalf of victims of conflict.
When a resolution was before the United States Congress to send US troops to the conflict that Evelyn had survived, she noticed that there was no provision for protecting innocent women and children. We worked with our partners on Capitol Hill to bring Evelyn before Congressional leaders to shed light on this issue. After individual advocacy meetings, she appeared at a hearing before Congress with an impassioned and well-informed plea for policy change. As a result of Evelyn’s advocacy, the resolution now includes a provision calling on the U.S. to help regional governments “incorporate precautions to protect abductees within LRA ranks, especially children and women, when carrying out operations against the LRA.”